Does dehydrating kill bacteria?

Chef's answer
The temperatures of dehydrators and oven dehydrating are not high enough to destroy harmful microorganisms that are typically present in raw meat. Even though fully dried jerky may appear done, it is not safe to eat unless it goes through an additional heat treatment. This can be done before or after the meat is dried.8 Feb 2017
Frequently asked Questions 🎓
Dehydrating meat, by itself, does not kill all harmful bacteria and parasites. There are other steps that need to be followed to ensure proper food safety.
Bend and Chew to Test Take the piece of jerky and bend it gently to about a 90-degree angle. If any moisture squeezes out, it's definitely not done yet and can go back into the dehydrator. If it cracks and breaks, you've left it too long, and it's already past the point of best flavor and texture.
You usually get odors similar to what you get if you cook the stuff you are dehydrating on the stove. Just for longer and not as intense.
Dehydrating or Drying Fruits, Vegetables, and Herbs Drying removes the moisture from food so that microorganisms such as bacteria, yeasts, and molds are less likely to grow
While electric dehydrators are commonly used for making beef jerky and for drying any lean meat cuts, there are still concerns that come with using the equipment. ... If you pause halfway through the drying process, you draw in bacterial organisms to develop even if the meat is already heated.
Once your jerky has cooled, try to bend it slightly. The form and structure we want to aim for is a strip of meat that can bend easily but without breaking. This is the ideal level of dryness we want from our jerky. If it rips in the middle then it's not dehydrated enough yet, whereas if it snaps then it's overly dry.28 Jul 2020
Drying removes the moisture from food so that microorganisms such as bacteria, yeasts, and molds are less likely to grow
A few more cooking questions 📍