What are the worms in broccoli?

Chef's answer
There are technically three types of broccoli worms: cabbage worms, cabbage loopers, and diamondback worms. Cabbage worms are the most common, a pale velvety-green in color. These pests are technically caterpillars, the larvae of white butterflies. Cabbage loopers, on the other hand, are the larvae of brown moths.
Frequently asked Questions 🎓
To maximize the shelf life of cooked corned beef for safety and quality, refrigerate the corned beef in shallow airtight containers or wrap tightly with heavy-duty aluminum foil or plastic wrap. Properly stored, cooked corned beef will last for 3 to 4 days in the refrigerator.
Corned beef and cabbage isn't actually the national dish of Ireland. You wouldn't eat it on St. Patrick's Day in Dublin, nor would you be likely to find it in Cork. It's typically only eaten around the holiday here in the U.S. So how did corned beef and cabbage become synonymous with the Irish?27 Feb 2019
3 to 4 daysProperly stored, cooked corned beef will last for 3 to 4 days in the refrigerator. To further extend the shelf life of cooked corned beef, freeze it
If you don't want to see anything with corned beef in it for awhile, Poses advises, "Have your freezer containers ready. Corned beef and cabbage freeze very well.17 Mar 2010
Strangely, the same wines that go with Thanksgiving dinner also go with corned beef and cabbage. If you prefer red, go with Beaujolais, Grenache (a Rhone varietal), or a light Zinfandel if you can find one. A light Pinot Noir, like from Anderson Valley, might also work. Steer clear of Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot.18 Mar 2009
Reheating corned beef and cabbage couldn't be easier. Fill a medium pan with just enough of the dish for your next meal and reheat it in the oven until the meat reaches a minimum internal temperature of 165 F, as recommended by the USDA FSIS.
The Irish immigrants almost solely bought their meat from kosher butchers. And what we think of today as Irish corned beef is actually Jewish corned beef thrown into a pot with cabbage and potatoes. The Jewish population in New York City at the time were relatively new immigrants from Eastern and Central Europe.15 Mar 2013
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