Why are my scallops orange?

Chef's answer
According to Dana, "orange meat is caused by an excess of a natural pigment called zeaxanthin in a female scallop. ... As the gonad ripens and takes on an orange hue, any overabundance of this pigment is transported into the adductor muscle [the part of the scallop we eat].18 Mar 2011
Frequently asked Questions 🎓
According to Dana, "orange meat is caused by an excess of a natural pigment called zeaxanthin in a female scallop. ... As the gonad ripens and takes on an orange hue, any overabundance of this pigment is transported into the adductor muscle [the part of the scallop we eat].18 Mar 2011
A classic way of cooking them is to coat them in seasoned flour and gently fry them in butter in a pan over medium heat for a few minutes each side until just done.17 Dec 2018
The orange (female) or grey-pink (male) shape attached is known as the coral and the roe or milt sacs. These have a more robust flavour and are often removed for sale but the combination of the two makes a very attractive presentation. Watch our video on how to clean and prepare scallops: Video Player is loading.
According to Dana, "orange meat is caused by an excess of a natural pigment called zeaxanthin in a female scallop. ... As the gonad ripens and takes on an orange hue, any overabundance of this pigment is transported into the adductor muscle [the part of the scallop we eat].18 Mar 2011
To shuck scallops (prise the shells apart), use a shucking knife, a sharp knife to release the meat. Discard the attached muscle, skirt and black stomach sack. Inside, you will also find a vivid orange roe (also called coral), which is often discarded but is actually edible.
To shuck scallops (prise the shells apart), use a shucking knife, a sharp knife to release the meat. Discard the attached muscle, skirt and black stomach sack. Inside, you will also find a vivid orange roe (also called coral), which is often discarded but is actually edible.
To shuck scallops (prise the shells apart), use a shucking knife, a sharp knife to release the meat. Discard the attached muscle, skirt and black stomach sack. Inside, you will also find a vivid orange roe (also called coral), which is often discarded but is actually edible. ... Once shucked, scallops can be cooked.
A few more cooking questions 📍