Why do Irish eat corned beef and cabbage?

Chef's answer
Traditional Irish bacon (ham) and cabbage. However, when these Irish got off the boats in America it was quite the opposite. Corned beef was the meat that they could easily and more cheaply get their hands on and, so, this became the meal of choice for generations of Irish Americans to come.
Frequently asked Questions 🎓
The color orange is associated with Northern Irish Protestants because in 1690, William of Orange (William III)defeated the deposed King James II, a Roman Catholic, in the fateful Battle of the Boyne near Dublin.1 Mar 2021
Corned beef and cabbage isn't actually the national dish of Ireland. You wouldn't eat it on St. Patrick's Day in Dublin, nor would you be likely to find it in Cork. It's typically only eaten around the holiday here in the U.S. So how did corned beef and cabbage become synonymous with the Irish?27 Feb 2019
Potatoes are still a staple at most mealtimes, with traditional dishes remaining popular. Colcannon is a classic, comforting mash of potatoes, cabbage (or kale) and butter (or cream), flavoured with spring onions. Champ is a similar, mashed potato favourite, flavoured with spring onions, milk and butter.
In the United States, consumption of corned beef is often associated with Saint Patrick's Day. ... Corned beef was used as a substitute for bacon by Irish immigrants in the late 19th century. Corned beef and cabbage is the Irish-American variant of the Irish dish of bacon and cabbage.
Corned beef is not an Irish national dish, and the connection with Saint Patrick's Day specifically originates as part of Irish-American culture, and is often part of their celebrations in North America. Corned beef was used as a substitute for bacon by Irish immigrants in the late 19th century.
The unpopularity of corned beef in Ireland comes from its relationship with beef in general. From early on, cattle in Ireland were not used for their meat but for their strength in the fields, for their milk and for the dairy products produced. In Gaelic Ireland, cows were a symbol of wealth and a sacred animal.15 Mar 2013
Traditional Irish bacon (ham) and cabbage. However, when these Irish got off the boats in America it was quite the opposite. Corned beef was the meat that they could easily and more cheaply get their hands on and, so, this became the meal of choice for generations of Irish Americans to come.
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